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01 CCFTF Report COVER

The Community Center Feasibility Task Force (CCFTF) has completed its 18-month study process, concluding that it is feasible for the City of Upper Arlington to construct, operate and maintain a community center. At a Special City Council Meeting on December 16, 2020, the CCFTF Co-Chairs, Margie Pizzuti and Nick Lashutka, provided an extensive overview of the study process, their findings and recommendations, with the Task Force Report submitted to City Council and made available to the community early in the New Year.

THIS SITE CONTAINS HISTORICAL INFORMATION RELATED TO THE CCFTF AND IS NOT BEING UPDATED. CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE COMMUNITY CENTER DESIGN PROCESS SITE.

In response to the Task Force’s conclusion that it is feasible for the City to construct, operate and maintain a community center without an increase in taxes, on January 19, 2021, City Council approved legislation to bring the proposed Upper Arlington Community Center to a vote of the people on May 4, 2021, and to authorize various funding mechanisms that would enable the City to construct, a Community Center without any increase in City income or property taxes.

The final CCFTF Report to the Community is available here in its entirety, along with a full history of the work of the Task Force, including meeting minutes and videos. The Task Force encourages residents to read beyond the Executive Summary document to gain a full understanding of the opportunity before our community, so that when you complete your absentee ballot or head to the voting booth on May 4, 2021, your questions have been answered in full.

Visit upperarlingtonoh.gov to learn more about the Upper Arlington Community Center ballot issue and to contact the City with any questions that you might have on this important community issue.

2019-2020 UPPER ARLINGTON COMMUNITY CENTER FEASIBILITY STUDY

Report to the Community

01 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

  • Letter of Transmittal
  • Acknowledgements
  • Table of Contents
  • Executive Summary Report
  • Resolution of Support for the Feasibility of a Community Center for the City of Upper Arlington
  • Letters of Support:
    • Upper Arlington Parks & Recreation Advisory Board
    • Upper Arlington Senior Advisory Council

02 ESTABLISHMENT OF TASK FORCE

  • Resolution #11-2019

03 COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

  • Phase I      Stakeholder Interview Summary – February 2020
    • PHASE I COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT REPORT
      • – Stakeholder Focus Group Summary – May 2020
      • – Community Pop-up Summary – May 2020
      • – Community Meeting Summary – May 2020
    • Statistically Valid Survey Findings Report – April 2020
    • Statistically Valid Survey Crosstabulations – April 2020
  • Phase II      PHASE II COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT REPORT
      • – Stakeholder Focus Groups and Community Meeting Summary
    • Community Center Survey Results Presentation
    • Statistically Valid Survey Results – November 2020
    • Statistically Valid Survey Cross tabulations – November 2020
    • Online Survey Results – November 2020
  • Publicity

04 MARKET ANALYSIS

  • Demographics and Trends Analysis – March 2017
  • Membership Market Information
  • Similar Provider Analysis – May 2020
  • Similar Provider Square Foot Per Capita

05 POTENTIAL PARTNERSHIPS

  • Identified Potential Partnerships – May 2020
  • Potential Partnerships by Industry – May 2020
  • Partnership Models

06 VISIONING AND PROGRAMMING

  • Core Program Spaces Description – May 2020
  • Core Building Activity Reference Images – May 2020
  • Core Building Space Program – October 2020

07 SITE EVALUATION AND ANALYSIS

  • Preliminary Potential Sites Map
  • Preliminary Site Evaluation Spreadsheet
  • Preferred Sites Map
  • Preferred Sites Evaluation Spreadsheet

08 SITE AND BUILDING ANALYSIS / PLANNING

  • Municipal Services Center (MSC) Concepts
    • Site Plan Concepts
    • Site Plan Concepts with City Engineer Comments
    • Parking Analysis
    • Preliminary Concept Plans
    • Preliminary Massing Model
  • Kingsdale Concepts
    • Existing Kngsdale Site
    • Overall Site Development Plan for Kingsdale Site
    • Parking Analysis
    • Preliminary Community Center Concept Plans
    • Preliminary Massing and Stacking Diagrams
    • Preliminary Interior Views

09 CAPITAL COST

  • Preliminary Order of Magnitude Budget Summary
  • Preliminary Capital Funding Sources

10 BUSINESS PLAN

  • Overview of City Finances
  • Assumptions & Pro Forma
  • Membership Structure
  • Preliminary Pro Forma – Full Potential
  • Preliminary Pro Forma – With Market Stress Test

THE CHARGE

The CCFTF was charged with determining if the Upper Arlington community wants and needs a community center, key questions to be explored in the first phase of the study process. Upon concluding that the community does want and need a facility, a second phase of the study focused on determining the types of facilities and programming that should be in a community center, possible locations, as well as funding strategies. The scope of the feasibility study included:

  • Ensuring that the study process provides extensive opportunities for community participation.
  • Assessing the community’s needs and existing conditions, including options for the replacement of the City’s existing Senior Center.
  • Reviewing the facilities and models of operation in other communities.
  • Reviewing Upper Arlington’s history relative to the community center issue.
  • Identifying possible locations, desired amenities and projected costs.
  • Exploring funding strategies for constructing, operating and maintaining a prospective facility, including consideration of public/private opportunities.

VIDEOS

MEETINGS & PRESENTATIONS

MEETINGS in 2021

PHASE II MEETINGS in 2020

    PHASE I MEETING SCHEDULE

    2019 MEETINGS

    COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT ACTIVITIES

    PHASE II

    Surveys

    A statistically valid telephone survey of 300 randomly selected Upper Arlington voters was fielded in mid-November to gauge resident sentiment on options for a location, building program and funding options. Once the telephone survey had been completed, an online version was made available to all residents in the community, yielding 1,609 responses. While the data obtained from the online version serves only as supplemental information, the responses obtained were generally consistent with those yielded by the telephone survey.

    Community Meeting

    Thursday, October 8, via Zoom
    View the Meeting Video
    View the Meeting Presentation
    View the Meeting Poll

    At the community meeting the Task Force’s consultants shared high-level “blocking and stacking” concepts for the two locations under consideration (former Macy’s site at Kingsdale, and the Municipal Services Center), showing how the various programing components could be incorporated within the available footprint.

    PHASE I

    Community Pop Ups

    A series of Community Pop Ups were held to bring the work of the CCFTF out to the places and events frequented by residents. These pop ups featured quick, idea generating activities for residents to engage in, as well as provide information on how to stay up-to-date and involved in the process.

    Dates and locations for the Community Pop Ups:

    • UA High School boys basketball home game – January 31
    • UA High School girls basketball home game – February 7
    • Volunteer UA Expo – February 8
    • Elementary Schools Concourse Gallery Reception – February 9
    • Tremont Library – February 16
    • UA Stage Dinner – February 19
    • Giant Eagle Market District (Kingsdale) – February 21
    • UA High School Production of Cinderella – February 22
    • UA Senior Center – February 27
    • Hastings Middle School Production of Frozen – March 6
    • Middle Schools Concourse Gallery Reception – March 8
    • Additional Pop Ups: Leadership UA Class; UA High School lunch break

    Community Meeting

    February 27, UA Senior Center, 1945 Ridgeview Road
    A community meeting was held to provide residents an opportunity to learn more about the feasibility study, and to provide feedback on the primary questions being addressed in this first phase.

    Surveys

    A statistically valid survey was fielded from early March through mid-April. This type of survey process is designed to ensure that responses are reflective of the community as a whole. Three thousand randomly selected households were mailed a survey packet that included a cover letter, hard copy of the survey with a postage-paid envelope, as well as a link to complete the survey online if preferred. The survey yielded 632 responses, far exceeding the goal of 400.

    Due to the COVID-19 pandemic the timing for an online survey open to all residents was put on hold.

    Youth Engagement

    Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, a series of surveys for the community’s youth were put on hold.

    ASSOCIATED DOCUMENTS

    To view documents associated with the Community Center Feasibility Task Force, search our Archives PortalSpecial Projects, Commissions & Task Forces using the following Special Meeting Type: Community Center Feasibility Task Force

    COMMUNITY CENTER FEASIBILITY TASK FORCE TEAM

    CCFTF Group

    Front Row (from left): Chuck Manofsky, Matt Rule, Bill Westbrook, Greg Comfort, Nick Lashutka
    Back Row: Todd Walter, Kelly Boggs-Lape, Supen Bowe, Margie Pizzuti, Linda Mauger, Merry Hamilton, Linda Moulakis, Wendy Gomez, Brian Perera
    Not Pictured: Dianne Albrecht, Yanitza Brongers-Marrero

    Dianne Albrecht Kelly Boggs-Lape Yanitza Brongers-Marrero
    Supen Bowe Greg Comfort Wendy Gomez
    Merry Hamilton Nick Lashutka, Co-Chair Chuck Manofsky
    Linda Mauger Linda Moulakis Brian Perera
    Margie Pizzuti, Co-Chair Matthew Rule Todd Walter
    Bill Westbrook

    OUR CONSULTANTS

    Williams Architects
    Architect, Public Engagement

    Tom C. Poulos, AIA, Principal-in-Charge
    Nan Weir, AIA, Managing Architect

    PROS Consulting
    Business Planning, Public Engagement)

    Leon Younger, President – Project Manager
    Philip Parnin, Senior Project Manager – Recreation Needs Analyst

    OHM Advisors
    Site Land Planning & Landscape Architect, Public Engagement

    Aaron Domini, Principal

    Early in the study process, the CCFTF determined they should secure the assistance of a consultant team experienced in conducting studies of this nature. In the fall of 2019, the process of identifying a consultant was led by a CCFTF Selection Subcommittee. By mid-November, the team led by Williams Architects—with subconsultants OHM Advisors and PROS Consulting—emerged as the preferred consultant. The CCFTF unanimously voted to recommend to City Council that the City enter into contract with Williams Architects to conduct the feasibility study in partnership with the CCFTF. Council approved the recommendation on November 25.

    The reasoning behind the recommendation included:

    The Williams Architects proposal detailed extensive community engagement activities and a clear understanding of the value placed on obtaining resident input;
    Representatives of Williams Architects and OHM Advisors are local to Central Ohio, which will be beneficial to the process;
    The team has previously conducted work in Upper Arlington and already has a good understanding of the community and its expectations—for example Williams Architects assisted PROS Consulting with the 2018 Parks & Recreation Comprehensive Plan, and OHM Advisors led the design process for the new Tremont Pool and Playground at Northam Park and is currently spearheading the Lane Avenue Planning Study;
    Collectively, the team has more experience conducting community center studies;
    The proposal integrated a statistically valid survey early in the process, and emphasized the importance of obtaining objective data that is reflective of the broader community;
    The proposal broke pricing down by project components and divided the work into two phases, with the findings of the first phase framed to help determine the validity of a second phase. Additionally, the proposal was the most cost effective.

    SUBCOMMITTEES

    The CCFTF Community Engagement Subcommittee was charged with developing an extensive, open and transparent community engagement process that encouraged multiple opportunities for citizen participation and input. With the support and guidance of the professional feasibility study consultant firm, the work of this subcommittee included:

    Planning and conducting a variety of public meetings (open houses, focus groups, pop up gatherings, etc.)
    Planning and conducting citizen surveys, to include one statistically valid survey, informal online surveys as appropriate, questionnaires, etc.
    Reviewing data and resident input gathered through previous outreach (2018 Parks & Recreation Comprehensive Plan, etc.)
    Creating summaries of the feedback obtained through these processes

    Members: Dianne Albrecht, Kelly Boggs-Lape, Supen Bowe (Chair), Merry Hamilton and Linda Moulakis

    The CCFTF Facilities Subcommittee was charged with developing the parameters for a prospective community center facility that would best fulfill residents needs and desires. This included:

    Visiting/reviewing facilities in comparable communities
    Assessing the community’s needs and existing amenities and programs
    Considering potential locations for a prospective facility
    Exploring existing models of public and private partnership opportunities

    Members: Yanitza Brongers-Marrero, Greg Comfort (Chair), Wendy Gomez, Chuck Manofsky and Bill Westbrook

    The CCFTF Finance Subcommittee was charged with exploring all financial considerations associated with a prospective community center. This included:

    Identifying possible sources of capital funding
    Identifying possible sources of funding for ongoing operations, programming and maintenance
    Consideration of financial business models for facilities in comparable communities
    Developing an overarching summary of funding strategy options

    Members: Linda Mauger, Brian Perera, Matt Rule (Chair) and Todd Walter

    The Task Force determined that the feasibility study process will best be served with the professional assistance of a consultant team experienced in conducting feasibility studies of this nature. The Selection Subcommittee was charged with reviewing and making a recommendation back to the Task Force of the Whole on the preferred consultant. This subcommittee was comprised of Greg Comfort, Nick Lashutka, Linda Mauger, Margie Pizzuti, Matthew Rule and Bill Westbrook.

    Subcommittee Schedule:

    November 25 City Council Meeting – City Council voted to award the contract to Williams Architects
    November 18 Council Conference Session – Task Force representatives presented its recommendation to City Council
    November 13 Task Force of the Whole – Task Force voted to recommend Williams Architects to City Council
    November 13 – Agenda
    November 12 – Agenda, Minutes
    October 30 Task Force of the Whole Meeting – Meeting included subcommittee update on selection process
    October 16 – Agenda, Minutes
    October 1 – Agenda, Minutes
    A Request for Qualifications (RFQ) was issued by the City in early September, with a deadline of September 23
    August 27 – Minutes

    SUPPORT STAFF

    The CCFTF was supported by the following City Staff members:

    Jeff Anderson, Parks Planning & Development Manager – consultant liaison lead, schedule coordinator
    Debbie McLaughlin, Parks & Recreation Director – Facilities & Partnerships Subcommittee support lead, key stakeholder facilitator
    Dan Ralley, former Assistant City Manager – Finance Subcommittee support lead
    Steven Schoeny, City Manager – CCFTF support lead, key stakeholder facilitator
    Emma Speight, Community Affairs Director – Community Engagement Subcommittee support lead, communications & outreach

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